Meta snapshot #10 - December - 27.12 - Season of Wild Hunt

[27.12] Release: 10 new decks, Way Of The Witcher cards reviews, extended deck description, mulligans and win condition info, new matchups & gameplan info, new win ratio, and popularity stats + new cards popularity stats.

Tier 1

Skellige - Lippy | Ursine Ritual | 4.5 stars


Lippy is now one of more popular decks on the ladder with new Witcher cards bringing it back to life. Another addition, Snowdrop, will increase your chances to Draw necessary cards and Boosts itself by 2 whenever you draw. Bear Witcher can also make 8 points at 5 Provision Cost – definitely worth including. Haern Caduch can make 8 Points with 6 Points Carryover, which is valuable for its Provision Cost. Although this Lippy is different than last season’s, it’s perhaps even more popular.

 

Mulligans:

You’ll want to Mulligan Roach, Knickers, and Morkvarg.
Try to draw for: Cerys, Birna, Snowdrop, and Heymaey Skald with Tuirseach Skirmisher.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

You’ll want to play Cerys to make big Tempo, expanding on it with other valuable Gold and Bronze cards.

Round 2

Aim to make Round 3 as short as possible, but ensure you have a path to drawing Lippy (avoid using him or Oneiromancy twice before your final Round).

Round 3

You can also try to draw Oneiromancy in Round 3, then playing Lippy – but it’s riskier.

 

Matchups:

Northern Realms:

Northern Realms generally likes long rounds. You should aim to win Round 1 and play the shortest Round 3 possible. It’s going to be challenging to stop Griffin Witcher Adept, but you have some big Tempo plays available, so there are chances for you to win Round 1. On Red Coin, this matchup will be much easier.

Bleed or not?

It’s ideal to bleed – a short Round 3 is best for Lippy lists.

Who will win?

You have a little bit of Control, so if you can stop the enemy’s Engines, you’ll win in this matchup.

Scoia’tael:

It’s important to win Round 1. Having the last say in Round 3 is good because your opponent’s Gezras von Leyda can’t damage your Melee Row (where Cerys an Craite is played). A short Round 3 is the key to winning the match. In most long Round 3s you will lose in this matchup.

Bleed or not?

Your only chance will be to bleed.

Who will win?

Against Guerilla Tactics you’ll have a better chance in short Rounds than against Precision Strike (which can generate more points in shorter Rounds).

Monsters:

Viy is the favourite in this matchup. Your only answer will be Heatwave, which you can play twice – but it’s unlikely to be enough. You’ll have a chance to win Round 1, you’ll have to Bleed Round 2, and then enter Round 3 with Heatwave in hand. Against Deathwish, you’ll have better chances, however. Heatwave is a good answer to Haunt.

Bleed or not?

Viy List: Bleed and save Heatwave for Round 3.
Deathwish List: Bleed and save Heatwave (answer to Haunt).

Who will win?

Viy deck is the favourite. You have better chances against Deathwish, but Lippy still won’t be the favourite.

Skellige:

Lippy can have some problems against Warriors lists. Your opponent can play strong Bronzes and setup the graveyard for Round 3. If you play a short Round 3, you’re unlikely to have enough Points to win. Harald, Skjordal, and your Leader Ability with Hemdall make for very big Points, however. Cerys can sometimes be too low. A short Round will definitely be better than a long Round, however.

Bleed or not?

Bleed in order to force Hemdall and Harald from your opponent’s hand – it’s your only chance to seize an advantage.

Who will win?

Warriors are favorable in this matchup.

Nilfgaard:

This deck should win Round 1 against Kolgrim lists. Ideally, you’ll want to Bleed Round 2 and play Lippy. Then, discard most cards from your deck. A short Round 3 with Cerys should then serve fine. With your deck being short, opponent’s Kolgrim will make few points.

Bleed or not?

You’ll want to bleed for as long as possible.

Who will win?

Lippy is the favorite here.

Syndicate:

The new Self-Poisoning Syndicate requires time to generate Points, so your Tempo plays should be enough to win Round 1. Your strategy will be similar as in other matchups – win Round 1, Bleed Round 2, winning a short Round 3 with Cerys. This should also be effective against Passiflora.

Bleed or not?

Bleed, as short Rounds will be more useful for you – most Syndicate decks prefer longer rounds.

Who will win?

If you’re able to avoid a long Round 3 and secure a short one instead, you should end up the winner.

 

Win condition:

Cerys an Craite, Svalblod Totem

 

Good against:

Nilfgaard, Skellige Warriors, Syndicate Self-Poison

Bad against:

Monsters Viy

 

Cards replacements:
Tactical Advantage -> Mask of Uroboros

Scoia'tael - Movement | Guerilla Tactics | 4.5 stars


More Movement has been one of the most anticipated additions brought by Way of the Witcher – along with, of course, plenty Witchers. This list is slightly modified from ggChucho’s version. Although Leader Ability and selection of Golds will vary on the Ladder, Gezras of Leyda appears to currently be a must-have. Some team’s reports have also suggested lists making use of Devotion, but I’ve personally found more success by relying on Korathi Heatwave and Geralt: Quen.

 

Mulligans:

While this deck is quite versatile, Call of the Forest and Geralt: Quen are extremely valuable in terms of accessing cards like Gezras of Leyda, Brehen, and Gaetan. Dunca and Miner are also cards you may want to avoid using your Mulligans on.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

You’ll most likely want to try for a win in Round 1 – Dol Blathanna Sentry can help achieve this, but it’s best to save your second copy for your last Round.
Dunca is best played early in a long round if it’s safe from Removal.

Round 2

A short Round 2 is recommended as Units like Gezras of Leyda and Gaetan reap the greatest advantage from long Rounds.

Round 3

Gezras of Leyda, Brehen, and Gaetan will be your keys for success – setting up and protecting Dol Blathanna Sentry early in the round will contribute to this (remember, Miner is best used on Figgis Merluzzo to avoid removal).

 

Matchups:

Scoia’tael:

As Movement is popular in the Meta, you’ll have to work to avoid situations where your own card’s Movement can be used against you – or where Moving your opponent’s cards might inadvertently give away points.

Skellige:

In certain Skellige matchups you may be able to cause havoc by moving your opponent’s Units that either have a Lane designation or require a Unit to be adjacent to it.

Nilfgaard:

You’ll have to be careful to protect valuable Units (including not letting them get too Tall) and avoid your own deck’s Synergy being used by your opponent (e.g. cards like Bribery).

 

Win condition:

Gezras of Leyda and Dol Blathanna Sentry are generally essential to victory – however, having many units on either your or a Row of your opponent can be an alternate strategy (i.e. Brehen and Gaetan).

Note: For most matchups, Bleeding tends to be a poor strategy because long rounds are where you’re going to accumulate the most points (and you will lack Removal power in comparison to many opponent’s lists).

 

Good against:

Decks where Units have Lane designations or need adjacent Units to activate their ability are where you can cause the most disorder for your opponent.

Bad against:

Decks that can easily remove Tall Units or use your own cards/Synergy against you.

 

Cards replacements:
I’ve added Crystal Skull and Squirrel, but consider changing how many of each Bronze Witcher you have as the Meta changes – also, consider swapping Dunca and Treant Boar if you feel you require more Removal power.

Monsters - Viy | Overwhelming Hunger | 4.5 stars


You can love him or hate him, there isn’t any place for neutral feelings. Viy is one of the most interesting cards from the new expansion, and it heavily determined the meta in the first few days. The possibility of boosting a card to even more than 30 points and playing him twice (or more!) in a short R3 hasn’t been possible since Homecoming, until now. The most important thing to remember when you are playing Viy is to manage your consume units and ability charges well. Remember to consume Viy every turn that you play in order to avoid a Korathi Heatwave. This deck has extreme point potential in both short and long rounds, but it is very vulnerable to tall removal. It can also lose long rounds against greedy engine decks. If you draw correctly try to use your bronze consume units in R1, scenario in R2 to bleed and your leader ability in R3. Obviously sometimes you are forced to change your strategy. Leader ability can rescue you, either by diversifying where your points are stacked (when you expect tall removal ) or when you don`t have consume units. This deck has a very small number of control options, but Spores can be helpful in some matchups.

 

Mulligans:

Additional Foglet, Spores and Squirrel depending on matchup.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

In every matchup you want to win R1, and you can spend your tutors because they generate more and more carryover. Even if you can`t win this round, try to play a long R1 to make R3 as short as possible.

Round 2

In 99% of cases bleed your opponent. It is good to use your scenario in this round. The additional tempo that this gives you means that you are sometimes able to 2-0.

Round 3

Play your Viy with your last tutors.

 

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

Ihuarraquax is the most dangerous card, because it can take your Viy away from your deck after you pass. Therefore you shouldn`t pass if Viy is in your deck and your opponent hasn`t played Ihuarraquax yet. If you win R1 you must bleed if you don’t have Viy in hand.

 

Northern Realms:

There are 3 main NR decks right now. Control Revenants probably have a better long round and you don`t have the control options to answer them. If you don’t win R1 you will have big problems. NR swarm is easier because you have a much better short round and similar point potential in the long round.

Bleed or not?

It is NR so you always want to bleed them.

Who will win?

Against Revenants you may have some problems. Witcher swarm is much easier to deal with, but beware Yrden. Shieldwall has a powerful long round and their duels and Baron are able to destroy your Viy so it is quite a difficult matchup.

Scoia’tael:

Every version of Movement has really dangerous engines, so in a long round you are in trouble. Because of that you must push your opponent hard. Ihuarraquax can draw out Gezras in R1 and increase your chances in a long round.
Bleed or not?

You must bleed, because their engines will devastate you in a long round.

Who will win?

It is 50/50. In most cases the winner is the player who won R1.

Monsters:

Koschey doesn`t have much removal and its pointslam potential is a bit worse. Therefore you are okay in long rounds against this and you can try to bleed your opponent’s Koschey out.

Bleed or not?

In a 10 card R3 Koshey may have problems with boardspace so you should probably win a long round.

Who will win?

You are favoured in this matchup.

Skellige:

Lippy can be destroyed with Ihuarraquax – sometimes your opponent will just forfeit and you can win in 3 minutes. You have better pointslam options, as well as having a more stable long and short round. Your opponent probably has quite weak control tools.
Warriors have lots of control options, but they focus on engine decks. Your pointslam is just better, and they also don`t play Korathi Heatwave so it’s a bit easier to play Viy safely.

Bleed or not?

You can, but it isn`t necessary against Lippy. Against warriors bleeding is a good option.

Who will win?

You are favoured in both matchups.

Nilfgaard:

There is Kolgrim, various control ball versions and assimilate (who may also be playing with scenario). All of these have a better R3, but you should be able to win R1 and bleed your opponent. Ivar (fortunately most decks don`t play him actually) is your nightmare if you don`t draw him out with Ihuarraquax. Kolgrim decks can also sometimes steal your Viy. You might as well forfeit in this case. Lockdown is a very bad matchup for you.

Bleed or not?

You must try to make your opponent play their Ball and make R3 as short as possible.

Who will win?

It is a difficult matchup, but you have a chance to win.

Syndicate:

Congregate has worse pointslam potential and weak control options. You can win in most cases. Hidden Cache may be a more difficult matchup, but you are still in quite a good position. Spores can rescue you sometimes, as they play tall. Poisons are in theory dangerous but in practice you will probably only be memed by the Salamander.

Bleed or not?

In each case you want to bleed opponent. You have much a better R3.

Who will win?

Against HC you can lose a long R3, but generally you are favored. Against other Syndicate decks it is a really easy game.

 

Win condition:

Viy, Ihuarraquax in some matchups.

 

Good against:

Lippy, Koschey, SK warriors.

Bad against:

Movement and other greedy engine decks if you can`t win R1, NG – especially if your opponent plays Ivar.

 

Cards replacements:
Decree -> Korathi Heatwave

Tier 2

Skellige - Warriors | Patricidal Fury | 4.25 stars


An entire new expansion has come and gone but Skellige Warriors has stood the test of time to come out on top yet again. The game plan is the same but the deck has been refurbished with new cards like Bear Witchers and Haern Caduch.

 

Mulligans:

Mulligans are match-up dependent a lot of the time. You might want to just play some graveyard bronzes and pass at 7 or you might want to contest the round. Depending on that you should mulligan golds or keep them. Try not to mulligan too aggressively in case you end up bricking your Raiding Fleet. Having access to Blood Eagle can be good in case you need to play a heavy tempo play.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

You should try to contest the round with your boats and some bronzes like An Craite Raiders and Greatswords. Try your best not to overcommit your golds but if round control is necessary you can commit one or two golds to win the round. Try to play around potential squirrels if you are thinking of going for Blood Eagle.

Round 2

A lot of the time you should be dry passing Round 2 considering you win Round 1. However you can definitely get bled Round 2 which makes mulliganing Harald if you have him in hand a good option in case you get bled out of him.

Round 3

This deck has arguably the best Round 3 and you should be able to convert a win in a long round 3 most of the time. Usually the sequencing is pretty linear in this stage of the game but it can change depending on how the opponent plays and whether or not you have first say in the round or not.

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

In the mirror matchup you mainly want to try and trade up bronzes in Round 1. Having blue coin is an advantage since you can protect your boat effectively and that alone can win you the round. Having last say means that you can effectively Champion’s Charge your opponent’s Arnjolf and also deny a good Champion’s Charge on your own Arnjolf.
At the end of the day the mirror comes down to whoever has the most resources going into Round 3 like all other mirrors.

 

Northern Realms:

Against Northern Realms you definitely have a favoured long round. However, contesting Round 1 can be difficult for you depending on your and your opponent’s hand. The ideal scenario is to be able to win Round 1 and dry pass into a long Round 3, however if you do get bled Round 2 it can be valuable for you to send your Harald away so you can have a more playable hand.

Bleed or not?
You should take a long round since you have enough control to counter the engine based Northern Realms.

Who will win?
It should be favoured for you however you can fall short if you miss your control options at the opportune moments.

Scoia’tael:

Scoia’tael is also an engine based matchup, which can make it hard for you to win Round 1. So once again, you are better off trying to just trade up bronzes. Try saving your removal options for later rounds. However, you should be very good in a long round since the deck plays exactly into your game plan.

Bleed or not?
You should not bleed against Scoia’tael decks and instead take the long round.

Who will win?
You are definitely favoured to win this particular matchup.

Monsters:

Right now Monsters is composed mostly of Viy. Try to keep your high provision golds like Harald and Hemdall in your hand since you can get milled of them thanks to Ihuarraquax. The matchup should be favoured for you in a long round

Bleed or not?
A long round is favoured against a Viy deck so if you are able to win Round 1 you should take the long Round 3.

Who will win?
Usually you should be favoured in this matchup especially if you have Morkvarg. However, it can get a bit more tricky if you don’t play Morkvarg, so tech him in if you run into this matchup a lot.

Skellige:

Right now the popular Skellige deck apart from warriors is the Lippy deck. Winning Round 1 can be tricky against Lippy but you should definitely push to win it if your opponent has an awkward hand and you know that they have a bricked Roach/Shieldmaiden in their hand.

Bleed or not?
If you are able to win Round 1 you should take a long round against Lippy.

Who will win?
Depending on draws and especially how your opponent draws it can be slightly unfavoured for you. However, if you are able to preserve Harald and Hemdall for Round 3 they can combine to get a lot of points hence it is definitely a winnable matchup.

Nilfgaard:

The matchup against Ball decks can be a 50/50. You are slightly unfavoured in a long round, but if you can deny them proactivity and/or force them to play Ball early in the round you can make their sequencing awkward, forcing a bad poison proc. Against the Kolgrim deck you should definitely be favoured as long as you have last say and are able to take care of the defender.

Bleed or not?
A slight bleed against Ball decks can be effective since they could have an awkward hand to defend the bleed with which could force them to play out their Ball or their aristocrats out early.

Who will win?
It is a 50/50 matchup which can be won by either side depending on draws, round length and player skill.

Syndicate:

The most popular SY decks you are likely to see on ladder are the old Hidden Cache list or a newer Hidden Cache list with no Passiflora and a self poison archetype. Both of these matchups are favourable for you since you pack a lot of control options which is good against decks that play a lot of engines.

Bleed or not?
You should always be happy taking a long round against Syndicate. The deck can potentially play Maraal so reducing the value the card gets in this matchup can be important, hence it can be better to play your leader late in the round.

Who will win?
You should be favoured to win this matchup.

 

Good against:

Northern Realms Shieldwall, Monsters

Bad against:

Enslave Ball

 

Northern Realms - Revenant control | Mobilization | 4.0 stars


If you don’t want to play boring old Shieldwall and are unsatisfied with the new NR witcher swarm, then revenants are a great way to play NR right now. With most decks lacking enough control tools to stop the revenant swarm, the deck is pretty powerful at the moment. The goal is to use revenants to get control of the first round to make sure you get last say in round 3. In the final round, the deck can be extremely reactive, denying the opponent removal value, or it can set up the engines before removing everything your opponent plays. Your leader ability is best used on Redanian Archers in the final round, since it’s very useful for setting up Revenants, Forbidden Magic and Falibor. Against control decks it is usually better to use leader on revenants a bit later. Adalia and Amphibious Assault are great for protecting revenants and archers, because without a boost or a shield they can be destroyed easily.

 

Mulligans:

In round one, try to keep at least two ways to play Revenants. Remember that you need both low provision bronzes to set up removals and gold finishers (especially in
R1 but redanian archers are a good choice in most situations). Keep in mind that Adalia needs an NR unit and your leader needs a soldier. The round 3 mulligan is actually similar to round 2, just fish for your best cards and kick out 4p bronzes but still keep in mind that Adalia and your leader ability need to have a target.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

The deck really needs to win this round. Push this round hard with your control tools and revenants. Don’t be afraid to commit valuable golds like Falibor and Curse of Corruption to secure the round.
You can play AA with Oneiromancy to set up your hand for next round.

Round 2

Usually you want to drypass, but on the other hand if you won R1 on even and your opponent has a strong long round (like control NG) you can commit to an aggressive bleed.

Round 3

If you know your opponent’s deck is control heavy with interactions on your side of the board, you can try being a ‘no unit’ deck with cards like, Heatwave, Boiling Oil, and Curse of Corruption to deny them control value. Otherwise play Adalia, use mobilization and set up engines.

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

Both coins have some advantages, blue make you vulnerable to Curse of Corruption but Stratagem is a big advantage in terms of protecting your engines. Phillipa can reset opponent board sometimes and rescue you if your opponent sets up too many engines.

 

Northern Realms:

Shieldwall, the deck you are definitely favoured against, however less popular versions with egmund and falibor are in good positiona against you. You should bleed in a mirror because the person that sets up their engines first has the advantage, and against NR commandos because of Draug.

Scoia’tael:

Precision Strike Control is a really difficult opponent. Your opponent can easily remove most of your engines. That being said, you have tall removals to answer gord and other boosted unit. Red coin gives big advantage here. If you are on blue both bleeding and playing long R3 might be problematic.
New engines movement decks are a much easier opponent, because you have powerful control tools and they may have problems dealing with your revenants. You should win in a long round, so bleed isn’t necessary. Sabrina is also really efficient here.

Monsters:

Against Viy you can use CoC to secure R1, because you’ll win r3 if it’s a long round. Viy is always dangerous, but without any control you can play your engines as greedily as possible.
Like Viy, Koshey doesn’t have many control tools and because of that its also good matchup. However you should fight hard for r1, because getting bled in this matchup can be dangerous.

Skellige:

Thanks to Sabrina lippy is quite nice matchup (but definitely isn`t easy, because of strong tempo plays and some removal options). Don`t bleed lippy, they have way too much tempo.
Warriors have various options to deal with revenants. I prefer bleeding in R2, often with leader ability.

Nilfgaard:

Poisions don’t make great value, as most units in this deck have pretty low point values. However, tactics and locks are much worse and because of that enslave is a difficult matchup. Lockdown is also unpleasant, because you rely on your ability, when want to set up engines.
Against Brickhaard a lot depends on whether you are able to kill Kolgrim, if yes you are favored. Bleed only if you won on even.

Syndicate:

Hidden cache is an engine overload deck, so in this matchup you can remove most of their stuff and make your opponent struggle. Watch out, because if your opponent beats you in R1 he can set up engines quickly and get CA.
Congregate is also in difficult position, because it provides nice bodies for revenants to kill. Watch out for Jacques and you should win
Selfpoison is easy both in long and short round.

 

Win condition:

Mass removal and Archers + Revenants swarm

 

Good against:

SY, Swarms, engine decks without removals ( SW with vysogota, most movement decks)

Bad against:

SK wariors, PS nounit, some countered decks with various medium range removals

 

Cards replacements:
Sheala

Nilfgaard - Assimilation | Double Cross | 4.0 stars


This deck doesnt contain any cards from the expansion, but changes from the last patch gave assimilate the opportunity to finally be something more than a meme. Coup de Grace is actually a really strong option with various possible options to play. Surprisingly Angouleme becomes a hero because most of meta decks are playing scenario or location. Location activates assimilate ability twice and the scenario may do it even three times! Scenario gets you also a nice control tool for R3. Decks feel the best in the long round, however Ball and Joachim (or strong golds like Braathens) are also good if you must play the short one. You are able to play your opponent’s card and the Adrenaline tag highly increased power of leader ability, because the opponent must play his best card later – when you are able to play them with Double Cross. Because of that, you are able to deal with most decks in the long round, have a nice consistency, and huge point swings. The biggest problem of that deck is a fact that it needs to set up the engine first and then play a card that would activate them.

 

Mulligans:

Mulligan 4p cards to have access to your Portal, which is a card you definitely want to play in R1. It provides a thinning and a nice tempo.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

Set up engines with Glynnis Portal and Vigo (amount depends on the expected length of the round. If opponents would rather pass fastly, don’t overcommit. Then play cards, which activate your assimilate ability.

Round 2

In most matchups, you want to drypass.

Round 3

Play your engines, scenario, and powerful plays like Joachim and Braathens. Watch out because you have only 2 aristocrats (and one additional from Coup de Grace).

 

Win condition:

Ball, Assimilate engines

 

Nilfgaard - Enslave | Enslave | 4.0 stars


“Tale as old as time, Nilfgaard and the Ball!”
Expansion after expansion, Masquerade Ball stays in the meta, but there is good reason for this. As a reactive deck, it can be tweaked to succeed in almost any meta based on the tech and removal you include. Ball has seen use with almost every leader ability, including Imposter, Lockdown, and Enslave.

The basic idea of the Masquerade Ball devotion deck should be familiar to most players by now. Set up your own engines while removing your opponent’s, bleed with Scenario, finish with Usurper for massive pointslam and engine proc value. However, this list skips Usurper in favor of abusing soldier engines, including the recently buffed Nauzica Sergant. It also runs the tactic-enslave package, giving you access to Helge and Fire scorpions as secondary engines to carry r1, as well as tons of removal.

On the one hand, you have access to engines that are easier to proc, protect, and can contribute to removal. On the other, you have to be more conservative about using units with Aristocrat tags to avoid bricking Ball. Overall, the deck relies a lot less on overwhelming tempo swings and more on engine overload, which is more in line with the current meta.

This deck is a testament to Masquerade Ball’s ability to find a place in any meta. It’s not the best deck in the game right now, but if you want to play a classic deck that has several safe crafts, you’ll do just fine with it.

 

Mulligans:

Ideally you want as much removal as you can get, depending on the matchup. If amnesty is in your opening hand, consider whether or not this match up will give you an opportunity to use it. If not, you want to throw it away. Coup de Grace is probably your biggest priority to get because of its echo effect. After that, you definitely want Helge. Overall, you want a healthy mix of bronzes and golds, enough to win the round but not so many golds that you’re forced to commit important cards or pass at an inopportune time.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

Be careful about playing Joachim here, because he can pull other high value cards, resulting in a massive overcommitment. Play Helge cautiously, minding your opponent’s removal. However, Helge is your ideal r1 card, because it incentivizes playing cheap bronzes, allowing you to save important golds for later. Lean on your other bronze engines as well to generate maximum value with minimum commitment.

Round 2

Don’t be afraid to use Ball to push here, Enslave is a high impact leader ability and more than capable of carrying r3 by itself against certain opponents. This obviously depends heavily on the matchup. If you lost r1, judge your opponents intentions. If they want a short round, try to pick an opportune time to drop scenario. Most people expect you to keep it as a win condition, so you can take them off guard. Besides, Ball isn’t great in a shortround anyway. Of course, if they want a long round, you’ll want to try to hold onto Ball if possible.

Round 3

If you didn’t use Ball yet, try to hang onto it as long as possible so it can poison higher value targets.

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

Make sure to keep a Tourney Joust in your hand for the enemy Helge, as Joust deals with it quite handily. In fact, you probably want to mulligan Helge away in this matchup for exactly that reason. Helge usually ends up playing for 4 points in this matchup.

Other than that, this matchup is a lot like other mirror matchups: it really just comes down to who goes into r3 with more resources, such as important golds and last say. Play carefully and keep track of what your opponent has committed.

 

Northern Realms:

NR is an engine based faction so a lot of the time you should be favoured in this matchup. You should have no pressure against Shieldwall, just be sure to use your locks conservatively and keep an answer for defender. Try to keep a joust ready against the witcher swarm deck, for it is the only 4p card in the game that can trade well with the new Griffin Witcher Adept and it can be game winning for you. The only NR matchup in which you can be slightly less favoured in is the revenants matchup in which you can have troubles if you overcommit unnecessarily. You also don’t get very good poison targets if your opponent plays the deck well. However, you still have decent plays to make like an amnesty on an archer or Ivar on units pulled from Amphibious Assault, hence you should still be expected to win this matchup.

Scoia’tael:

Movement Scoia’tael is one of the strongest decks in the meta right now, but you’re well equipped to deal with it. Use your removal judiciously to disable their engines while developing your own. Keep in mind that your opponent has plenty of removal as well.
Enslave really shines in this match up. Obviously Gezras is the ideal target, but Cat Witcher is also pretty devastating in a pinch. If they run Figgis (which many don’t), you can even steal that to protect your own engines.
Make sure to remember important adrenaline thresholds (cat witcher is 4, Gezras is 5) when bleeding and being bled, as they can change your math significantly.
Dol Blathana Sentry will lose you the game if you don’t remove it, as it buffs Cat Witchers and Gezras out of removal range on the turn they are played.

Bleed or not?
Yes. Movement decks rely on engine overload, and even Nifgaard can run out of removal in a long round.

Who will win?
The mechanics of your deck are extremely favorable when dealing with Movement decks, but you have to keep in mind the raw stopping power you’re dealing with. You have the tools to win, but little to no margin for error.

Monsters:

Ivar is really crucial in this matchup for punishing tall units. Ideally you want to save him for r3, but it’s extremely important to win r1 in this matchup so don’t be afraid to commit him.

This deck runs a ton of consumes, so they can easily make you waste your poisons. Use Roderick to pull a card with an aristocrat tag (Or Joachim if you’re feeling lucky/desperate) to double proc Ball for two poisons in one turn. This prevents your opponent from eating the poisoned unit before you can apply the second proc.

Keep a very close eye on what your opponent plays in r1 and r2, because it is entirely possible that they will be able to construct an r3 hand that makes it challenging or even impossible to use your leader ability at all. You can usually get away with using a damage card like Coated weapons to knock something down low enough, but it’s something to be aware of at all times.

Bleed or not?
No You can’t beat Viy with pointslam in a short round, it just can’t be done. However, in the long round you have access to Ivar and Poisons, which can generate massive value alongside your engines.

Who will win?
This matchup is pretty even, as you have a lot of tall punish, as well as engine potential that can exploit your opponent’s lack of removal. However, if you don’t plan ahead Viy decks can easily bury you in tempo burst in the early rounds, and then capitalize on that advantage to trap you in a short r3.

Skellige:

Lippy
Mulligan hard for amnesty, because stealing Roach or Knickers will reduce Lippy’s ability to push r2 or give value in r3. Try to get a Helge or Scorpion on the board quickly, because one ping lets you steal Cerys, which is even better.

Lippy has an explosive first round, but be patient. Get as many engines on the board as you can, and you should be able to compete with them by turn six. Ramon Tyrconnel is great as an opening play, as it reduces the value Blueboy gets, as well as completely preventing your opponent from using him as straight up removal.

Remember, most Lippy decks run Heatwave, so they can use it twice. If your opponent hasn’t used Lippy yet by turn three, and they used heatwave in r1, play scenario ASAP. They will have to play Lippy before they get access to heatwave again through Oneiromancy, so you’ll get at least one proc from your scenario before they can banish it.

Warriors
The matchup against Skellige Warriors is 50/50 for this deck. With the help of Helge/Fire scorpions and a couple of tactics, winning Round 1 can be very easy. Bonus points if you are able to Amnesty a Greatsword. If this deck wants to win Round 1 against you, it needs to overcommit heavily. Also setting up a warrior in your graveyard with the help of Amnesty allows you to use Invocation on Harald and using Joachim/Roderick to pull it out of your deck for a huge pointslam. However, if the player playing Skellige is smart enough, they can effectively win against you. The worst outcome in this matchup is if you aren’t able to effectively win Round 1 due to an awkward hand or a bad hand. Getting bled in Round 2 can be tricky to defend especially if you have Ball in your hand. However, if you are smart with your timing of playing Ball and if you are able to combine it with your leader to give you better tempo you can play Ball while being bled. Being greedy with the card can potentially lose you the game if you aren’t too careful. A long round should be favourable for you since you have decent control options and as long as you try your best to play around Hemdall effectively, you should be able to take this win.

Bleed or not?
No, Lippy is the tempo deck, and if you try to bleed on anything besides even cards you’ll probably end up a card down. Besides, your engines will generate more value over a longer round. Dry passing also may also force your opponent to waste Lippy in order to draw into important cards.

Who will win?
This matchup is rough. R1 is pretty even, but the problem is that if you lose r1 against Lippy, you can count on getting bled and you will almost definitely lose r3. However, if you win r1, you don’t have good options for pushing r2, so even though you’re favored in r3, your opponent is still capable of grabbing a win. In other words, Lippy is favored to win, but it’s still a relatively even matchup, especially if you manage to steal Cerys.

Nilfgaard:

Your lack of reliable tutors may punish you in a brickgaard matchup, so it’s important to mulligan aggressively for your best cards. Really this matchup comes down to one thing and one thing only: can you remove Kolgrim? As long as you’re smart about saving answers like Yenvocation and Cupbearer, the answer to that question should almost always be yes. You may even be able to steal him with enslave by knocking down his health with some damage.

Bleed or not?
Yes, but not terribly aggressively. Ideally you can force your opponent to throw away Kolgrim, but as long as you have something to answer him you don’t really have to do that.

Who will win?
You’re pretty favored here. Your engines are better, your removal is better, and all Brickgaard has to make up for this is Kolgrim, which you just so happen to have a ton of answers for.

Syndicate:

The most popular SY decks you are likely to see on ladder is the old Hidden Cache list or a newer Hidden Cache list with no Passiflora and a self poison archetype. Both of these matchups are favourable for you since you pack a lot of tall punish which Syndicate inevitably plays into. As long as you keep an answer to Azar Javed, you should be able to get the win in this matchup. If you have a Scorpion on the board with one charge, you can amnesty one scarab and ping down the other, removing their defenders in one turn and developing one of your own. Committing a strong card like Helge to win round 1 can prove beneficial since your lose condition in this matchup is to get bled out of your Masquerade Ball in Round 2.

Bleed or not?
Yes, Passiflora is an engine based deck, and you may force them to commit Scenario if you’re lucky.

 

Win condition:

Masquerade Ball is your primary win condition, along with engine overload. This is just a classic Nilfgaard deck, remove more of their engines than they can remove yours, and outvalue them.

 

Good against:

Brickgaard

Bad against:

Lippy, Movement Elves

 

Cards replacements:

2x Assassinate/Coated Weapons -> 1x Amnesty, 1x Battle Preparation

Running double Amnesty is generally a good idea if you’re running into a lot of Lippy decks, as has been the case at time of writing. Stealing Roach and/or Knickers is both decent tempo and a good way to reduce Lippy’s carryover.

Ivar Evil Eye-> Vincent Van Moorlehem

Ivar is a legendarily devastating point swing in your matchup against Viy, but can suffer against decks that don’t go tall, like Lippy.n He also has great synergy with your leader ability, allowing you to pretty much steal whatever you want. Vincent is a much more generalist pick, as defenders can be devastating to a control deck, and he procs scenario.

Overall, Ivar gets the most bang for your buck, but if you skip Vincent just make sure you’re running Yenvocation and/or Cupbearer to deal with defenders.

Tier 3

Northern Realms - Witcher swarm | Uprising | 3.75 stars


In the newest patch, Northern Realms have gained a new archetype which is based on spamming buffed witchers. This deck is pretty strong on blue coin because of massive proactive plays and solitaire potential. This leader ability has big finisher value even in a short round if you manage to save the buffed witcher trio, as youll as the scytheman from your leader ability.

 

Mulligans:

Make sure all three members of the witcher trio are in your deck so they can all be buffed by Erland. You should use mulligans as long as you don’t have Vesemir and Erland because they should be played in R1. You can look for Quen and John Natalis too because with them you have access to your whole deck.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

If you get blue coin, Crystal Skull can be used to protect your engines. You should try to win round 1 because your lack of control forces you to rely on last say to maximize Yrden value. You can try to win round 1 with Griffin witchers, adepts, Target practice, scytheman. Against other aggressive decks like Lippy or Viy you should fight even harder, and commit Leo, Quen, Berengar, John, Amphibious Assault or even Keldar if it is necessary.. One of the cards that you have to use in round 1 is Erland and Vesemir: Mentor. These represent big carryover, which should give us an easy win later. Try to play Erland Before using cards like Quen or Assault because of losing points on cards played from the deck.

Round 2

Against control decks bleed, against others drypass. Pay attention to the amount of board space your cards are going to take up. If it’s looking like you might hit capacity, now is the time to bleed a little to create some room.

Round 3

Play engines like Griffin witchers adept, then you can start spamming witchers from Keldar and transform witcher students to Griffin Adepts. At the end you have a big finish with Leo, Yrden and Scytheman from leader.

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

Save Yrden+Leader as a last say. Watch out for boiling oil + griffin witcher, a combination that can kill your adept.

 

Northern Realms:

As always you should play long round 1 and fight aggressively for it, because last say can be crucial in this matchup due to Yrden.

Bleed or not?
No. Long round with Yrden and leader ability should give you the win

Who will win?
NR witchers

Scoia’tael:

Movement has a lot of good engines but you can answer them with Boiling oil. You can try to keep one for Gezras later however if it is necessary you can commit that and count on Yrden and our engines.

Bleed or not?
Yes, you have a better short round and you can rely on the Witcher trio+leader combo. You can even commit Yrden in Round 2 to make sure your opponent doesn’t get card advantage.

Who will win?
Good bleed should give you the win in short round 3 but losing round 1 or bad draw can cost you the game.

Monsters:

In round 1 you should play as always but you have to win round 1 without committing Yrden. In a crisis situation, use Erland’s order before Yrden, but even this is risky. In this matchup, blue coin can help even more than usual because you will probably go deep in R1 and Griffin witcher will make a difference. With a bad hand in round 1 and an ideal one from your opponent it is just auto-lose situation because Viy will bleed Yrden and win short round 3.

Bleed or not?
Never

Who will win?
Depend on last say, coin

Skellige:

Lippy is a good matchup for you because you have tools to avoid losing card advantage in round 1. Blue coin can be helpful to win round 1 and go long round 3, but on red coin you can consider generating carryover with Vesemir and Erland and go to round 2 when Cerys will have to bleed us. You can easily defend from bleed thanks to Keldar, Assault adepts and Target practice combos and even you can win card advantage. Round 3 with our Witcher trio buffed to 5 and leader value is more than Cerys.

Do be wary of playing an important engine without anything else on the board, as most Lippy decks these days run Blueboy. Radovid’s Guard is perfect to play before more important units.

Bleed or not?
No.
Who will win?
NR witchers

Nilfgaard:

Nilfgaard has a few different decks with different matchups. Brickgaard should be a pretty nice matchup because their engines are weaker than yours. You should win round 1, which let’s you answer Kolgrim with Yrden in r3. Ardal’s ball is a worse matchup, because after winning round 1 you have to bleed. Winning round 1 is harder because of control like tourney joust and locks so they can remove our witchers efficiently. Then you have to push in round 2 and it is hard too because they have answers for Keldar and Leo.

Bleed or not?
Bleed Brickgaard, especially if you haven’t drawn Yrden yet.

Bleed Ball to try to force them to throw away their scenario.
Who will win?
Winning R1 is crucial to win this matchup. Man with last say should win

Syndicate:

Syndicate is quite a strange matchup because our Yrden should win for us round 3 but double salamander will smash our whole board, so you have to bleed. Winning round 1 is hard because of poisons, but you still can make good tempo with Griffin witchers and adepts. you should keep Keldar in our hand until your opponent plays Filippa. Blue coin helps us very much because of Veil neutralizes poisons.

Bleed or not?
Against double salamander you should bleed

Who will win?
On blue coin NR

 

Good against:

Lippy, Brickgaard, Koshey

Bad against:

Yrden, Movement

 

Cards replacements:
Leo+Yrden ->Roegner + Sirocco

Nilfgaard - Kolgrim Brickgaard | Tactical decision| 3.75 stars


At long last, a competitive Nilfgaard deck without Masquerade Ball! After languishing well behind the other factions for the last few seasons, Nilfgaard received a respectable buff and several new tools upon Way of the Witcher’s release. Out of the expansion a novel archetype for the faction emerged, and it has since proven powerful enough to end many of Nilfgaard’s woes and restore it to some prominence. This deck, which stocks up on the new cards, typifies much of what players hate about Nilfgaard when it’s strong—it interrupts opponents’ strategies, fiddles with their decks, and can feel absolutely hellish to play against. It accomplishes this by using cards like Viper Witcher, Infiltrator, and Cynthia to cram its opponents’ decks with garbage, hyper-thinning itself with Tactical Decision and pre-expansion cards (including the freshly-buffed Roach and Knickers), and unleashing Kolgrim, a devastating payoff card, in decisive rounds. The inclusion of Snowdrop in this version, though not strictly required by the deck’s gameplan, ensures its consistency and enables an excellent pointslam in conjunction with Morvran Voorhis. Though the totality of this strategy produces some very poor matchups and can suffer in the wrong round lengths, it dominates when things go right.

 

Mulligans:

Mulligans are straightforward. Roach, Knickers, and second copies of bronze thinners are hard bricks, as are triplicates of four-provision units. In first rounds, favour holding deck-interaction cards. It is acceptable to mulligan aggressively since Snowdrop and Morvran Voorhis can fix your hand. In later rounds, access to Kolgrim and Letho is necessary.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

Against decks that favour long rounds, this deck desperately needs to win the first round. Fortunately, Portal, thinning cards, and a good bronze package make this achievable. Try to focus on bricking your opponents’ deck and play Leo and/or leader if you absolutely must.

Round 2

If you’ve won the first round, you are encouraged to bleed as deeply as you can (this advice may not apply to the Lippy matchup). A long bleed will make your third-round hand better and your opponent’s deck worse. Your leader ability coupled with Snowdrop can make for a fantastic bleeding tool worth up to 23 points of raw tempo.

Round 3

If you’ve secured a short decisive round, Kolgrim will likely become your win condition; this is usually exactly what you want. Protect it with Ffion, and get extra greedy with Letho. If you anticipate two instances of tall removal, Snowdrop may be your best Letho target. If you fear Yrden, split your rows. Even in a long round, though, unanswered Kolgrim often produces enough points to win.

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

One of the major advantages of running Snowdrop here is that it guarantees a favourable matchup against more-standard Brickgaard lists. Assuming you and your opponent are able to thin and thicken your decks similarly, Kolgrim is effectively useless. You’ll win, instead, by protecting Snowdrop, targeting it with Letho—worth in this case up to 19 extra points—and using your leader’s card-drawing synergies to slam more points than your opponent can.

 

Northern Realms:

The most common Northern Realms deck right now is its new Uprising witcher swarm deck. It’s especially vulnerable to your bricking cards, since it produces 2-power tokens, but often runs Yrden, which is a hard counter to Kolgrim, and plays for a lot of points anyway.

Bleed or not? Bleeding is crucial in this matchup. You need to make your opponent’s draws as bad as possible, and long rounds favour their engine-based strategy. You may find it prudent, even, to bleed with Kolgrim, since it will trigger an extra time and Yrden is such a dangerous counter.

Who will win? You will have done all you can to win by securing round control and bleeding effectively. Even so, a timely Yrden may reduce all your hard work to ruin. Winning this matchup is likely, but certainly not guaranteed.

Scoia’tael:

All of the popular Scoia’tael decks in this meta rely upon movement synergies and payoff cards like Gezras and Gaetan. Since the popular decks’ bronze cards are so powerful, some of your bricking cards can actually be counterproductive. Fortunately, though, Ffion is usually enough in Scoia’tael matchups to ensure that your Kolgrim survives.
Bleed or not? You absolutely must bleed. Movement engines will destroy you in a long round, and your Kolgrim will be enough to win a short round. Losing a card after a bleed is often inconsequential.

Who will win? You will win if you can ensure a short third round. You may not be able to, though; Scoia’tael’s first round can be overwhelmingly powerful. Long rounds tend to guarantee losses.

Monsters:

Overwhelming Hunger, Monsters’ strongest leader ability, has found a new plaything in Viy. It’s so enamored with this card that its entire gold package exists just to make more of it. Fortunately for you, though, this leaves some weaknesses that Brickgaard can exploit: Kolgrim will live, and bricks go a very long way.

Bleed or not? Though it might seem beneficial to your opponent, you should bleed this matchup. Bleeding gives you more chances to give your opponent bad cards, and every brick s/he ends up with in the final round could be worth 20+ points to you.

Who will win? If your bricks can deny your opponent enough Viy procs, you will probably win, even if you yield card advantage. Leo Bonhart completely negates one of your opponent’s Viy plays.

Skellige:

Even though the Lippy/Cerys combo deck has existed in various forms, seemingly forever, and has always been competitive over that span, Gwent’s developers reckoned it could use a buff this patch. As a result, Lippy Skellige is arguably the strongest it has ever been. Though Arnjolf decks similar to those popular last season are still around to some degree, your most common Skellige matchup will be Ursine Ritual.

Bleed or not? Warriors thrive in long rounds, so naturally you should bleed them. Lippy, however, is perhaps the one non-mirror matchup you should consider dry-passing. Lippy Gudmund’s deploy ability makes many of your bricking cards useless, and shortening round three plays into your opponents strategy perhaps even better than into yours.

Who will win? You will be heavily unfavored in this matchup, especially if you lose the coinflip. This is especially true against control-oriented variants, which can handle Kolgrim easily.

Nilfgaard:

Besides the mirror, Assimilation will be your most-common Nilfgaard matchup. This expansion’s power-creep served to indirectly buff the Assimilate keyword and its synergy cards quite considerably and the new Location cards have made Angoulême remarkably consistent; the archetype, ancient as it is, is in an excellent state right now. Masquerade Ball, too, is just as intimidating as ever.

Bleed or not? As applies to other decks with strong long rounds, you absolutely should bleed Assimilate. Bricklaying is valuable, and Masquerade Ball, despite all its raw power, is especially vulnerable to a bleed in a deck that runs only two Aristocrats.

Who will win? Even if the game goes properly to plan, you’re likely to lose against a well-executed Assimilate strategy. The deck produces loads of points that you can’t remove, and Double Cross alone can effectively negate your win condition.

Syndicate:

Syndicate may be the new Nilfgaard, if you take that to mean an underpowered punching-bag for the other factions. You will not face many opponents playing Syndicate at the higher reaches of ladder gameplay, as the faction will now be even less popular than it was when it had strong options. When you see it, though, you can expect either one of the two competitive decks from last season or the new board-wiping Exodia package.
Bleed or not? Though Syndicate’s decks have very little in common with each other, they are all very beneficial to bleed. You can force out Passiflora against Hidden Cache, Congregate struggles in short rounds, and Exodia doesn’t accomplish much without round control.

Who will win? You should win. You can secure round control as you generate carryover, and Kolgrim can take over from there. Be sure to bleed out Salamander, though; you run neither veiled units nor purifies.

 

Win condition:

Bricking + Kolgrim/Letho. Alternatively, Snowdrop/Letho + Morvran Voorhis

 

Good against:

Syndicate, Viy, Mirror, Uprising

Bad against:

Lippy, Movement, Assimilate, control decks

 

Cards replacements:
Portal and one Infiltrator/Sergeant -> Heatwave and Viper Witcher Mentor
If and when the meta demands it, an extra unconditional tall removal option can be worth more than Portal. Yennefer’s Invocation adds anti-synergy to the deck, so Heatwave is the safer bet.
Some bronze reshuffling -> Viper Witcher Mentor
Mentor can be very awkward to play in this deck, but it is certainly a strong card.

Monsters - Koshchey thrive | Force of nature | 3.5 stars


Koshchey is a new card introduced by the Witchers expansion, and this list is mainly based on Thrive. Racking up points with Thrive and playing big Units is your main game plan. Koshchey has helped to revive Force of Nature as a leader ability a bit, and we can see this more often on the Ladder – but it’s not yet a top-tier deck. Geralt Yrden and other Tall-Removal cards can punish this deck badly – but if your opponent lacks them, you’re likely to win. This list is good to abuse Red Coin with and will perform worse on Blue Coin. Watch out, because with double Koshchey, it’s possible to run-out of space on the Board. Long rounds with more than 7 cards are dangeorus for this reason.

 

Mulligans:

You should Draw for Wild Hunt Rider or Ge’els – Ard Gaeth is good for making Tempo.
Be careful not to have all of these in Hand: Naglfar, Ard Gaeth, and Ge’els.
You should keep Ard Gaeth or Naglfar in your deck as a target for Ge’els.
Yghern is also good to play in early rounds, being Consumed by Ozzrel later in round 3.
You don’t want to have Winter Queen in your Hand – this card needs to jump from your deck.

 

Gameplan:

Round 1

Try to make big Tempo with Thrive and your better Bronze Cards – consider Yghern and Ard Gaeth, but save Auberon, Caranthir, and Koshchey for Round 3.

Round 2

Try to play this round, but save 3 or 4 cards for Round 3.

Round 3

You can play Ozzrel, Auberon, or double Koshchey for a large number of points.

 

Matchups:

Mirror:

Against non-Devotion lists, try bleeding (they may play Yrden) – sometimes victory will come down to who draws the most Golds.

 

Northern Realms:

Revenants will smash you in long round, and unfortunately, you also can’t control opponent’s engines. This also goes for Shieldwall. Against Swarm, you may have about a 50% chance in both medium length Rounds and short Round 3s.

Bleed or not?
You should always bleed – consider using Caranthir into Koshchey to make Round 3 shorter.

Who will win?
You are definitely in a difficult position.

Scoia’tael:

Movement has insane long round potential – if you lose Round 1, you may have lost the game.

Bleed or not?
You must bleed your opponent deeply – Ozzrel and Auberon with Koshchey are likely to make more points than your opponent in only 4-5 cards.

Who will win?
You’re not in a great position, but with Red Coin and Ard Geith you should be able to win Round 1 and Bleed your opponent.

Monsters:

Viy will win in most cases in long Round 3s as well as short rounds. Your best chance is to keep Round lengths to a medium.

Bleed or not?
You’ll want to play 5-7 cards in Round 3, but you can lose a card advantage easily.

Who will win?
You won’t be favoured in this matchup.

Skellige:

You’re in quite good position, but opponent’s Warriors can remove Koshchey easily.
Lippy has similar point potential and is also a formidable challenger.

Bleed or not?
You’ll want to play 5-7 cards for a long Round 3, so make sure to bleed your opponent a bit.

Who will win?
You have good chances here.

Nilfgaard:

Your opponent will have powerful Control options, which may be really problematic. You also won’t be able to answer to your opponent’s Kolgrim.

Bleed or not?
You must bleed – you can use 1 or even 2 of your Koshcheys here.

Who will win?
On Red Coin, try to win on Even – on Blue, you have quite small chances.

Syndicate:

Congregate and Hidden Cache generally prove to be better in long Rounds, but in medium ones you have similar point potential. However, be careful of Philippa stealing your Koshchey. Poisons have little Tempo in Round 1, and with a number of your veil cards in hand, this can be a promising matchup.

Bleed or not?
You should bleed a bit, but watch out – you can also lose your Card Advantage.

Who will win?
Hidden Cache makes for a difficult opponent, but your odds against Congregate will be better – especially if your opponent relies on Poison.

 

Win condition:

Caranthir Ar-Feiniel, Koshchey, Ozzrel, and Auberon

 

Good against:

Skellige Warriors

Bad against:

Monsters Viy and Nilfgaard Kolgrim

 

Cards replacements:
If you prefer, there is the Frost package and Devotion cards (for more control)

Honorable mentions

Northern Realms - Coëncidental (NR Coën Swarm) | Uprising


This variation on the NR Witcher swarm deck provides both the tools you need to build up your swarm as well as building up your board with evenly spread out boosts so you can use Coën to his full effect. And because of the consistency of Oneiromancy, Selective Mutation and Amphibious Assault, you will always be able to pull the cards you need.

Round 1: Play your bronzes and try to stick to the boosting combos such as the Tridam Infantry units, Temerian Drummers and Anna Strenger. Erland can also be used as early as possible so you have the carry over for later or use him as a round finisher if you need to. Griffin Witchers can be used as simple damage engines and can be devastating in a long round if you Veil them with Crystal Skull.

Round 2&3: Use Donimir to protect Vysogota and save your charges while setting up the Griffin Witcher Adept swarm. Keldar should be used when you’re at 5 cards and you can use your Vysogota charges pretty late (if he’s not in danger) to boost all your units evenly. Once everything is setup, trigger Coën at the power you want him to be at, Uprising can also be used to do this and watch your points sky rocket.

Check out the video for the full deck guide and an example match! And check out youtube.com/TroVNutPlays for more deck guides like this.

 

 

Skellige - Viking Revenge | Patricidal Fury


ST Movement decks got you down?

Lippy decks making you rage quit?

Northern Realms boosting themselves out of your reach?

No problem when you have the Bear Witchers by your side.

This hard hitting deck allows you to unleash the full potential of the new Skellige cards.

 

 

Way of the Witcher Card Reviews

Win ratio

Stats from top pro rank players. Who played: 581086 games. Updated: 27.12.2020.

Northern Realms

Scoia'tael

Monsters

Skellige

Nilfgaard

Syndicate

Faction popularity

Nilfgaard 27.81%
Skellige 19.73%
Scoia'tael 19.24%
Monsters 16.54%
Northern Realms 11.07%
Syndicate 5.61%

Cards popularity

Stats from decks posted on Playgwent in last 2 weeks. Updated: 27.12.2020.

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Writers, consultants and editors: Gregor__, Olsmer, KenzoSR, Darthlothins, JMTX,  Broglas, TroVNut, ggChucho, EmpressBlackSun, Jollyish and Crythene.

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